Improvisation to PFL Licensing Procedure Announced by UKGC

Improvisation to PFL Licensing Procedure Announced by UKGC December 6, 2018 Jack Jakob
December 6, 2018 by Jack Jakob

croupierIn a bid to make things easier when it comes to industry professionals applying to receive a Personal Functional Licence (PFL), the UK Gambling Commission (UKGC) is improving the application process.

The online application that professionals must currently use will soon change and fall in line with the one that is used via the Gov.uk website. This reconfiguration will take place so that the application form matches all other governmental applications. In this respect, the Gambling Commission is hoping that the procedure will become more streamlined, providing any applicants with extra support when filling it out.

In a press release from December 3, a statement reads that the service will be “an improved processing tool”, which will be utilised by the UKGC’s licensing staff. This will also include the introduction of something known as electronic Disclosure Barring Service (DBS) checks.

So, who does the PFL apply to? Well, the regulations of the UKGC requires casino employees holding the following roles to also be in possession of the PFL: Dealers and/or croupiers, cashiers, inspectors, security staff, pit boss and/or gaming supervisors.

When Does It All Take Place?

The Gambling Commission is currently working on the changes to the process, and this will continue on until the month of March next year. The decision to make such restructures came from the fact that the Commission is trying to raise its own standards.

It was in June of this year that the Enforcement Report from the UKGC gave bold hints at the measures that have been taken against any gambling operators who have been failing over the past three years.

Therefore, as well as drawing a hard line on any regulatory infringements on a specifically corporate level, a new set of guidelines for resolving disputes was introduced by the Commission. This particular introduction was designed with consumers in mind, ensuring that they have better courses of action to take should there be a problem. These guidelines intend to address any service failures across all levels of the gambling industry.

In this same respect, with the Gambling Commission making it simpler for casino workers to apply for their PFL, the regulatory body is bringing its own standards up to scratch. Any unsuitable candidates will be caught out by the electronic DBS checks, before they’re able to start operating with the public.

Of course, this procedure won’t provide a 100% guarantee against rogue employees. However, it should manage to increase the standards of the industry and assist heavily in avoiding any scams.

Keeping this in mind, between the raise in its own standards and the push by the Gambling Commission to generate a safer gaming environment for the UK’s players, it seems as though the UKGC is returning to its former glory of setting certain standards for the worldwide gambling industry.